Michelle's Wanderlust

Listen to your being. It is continuously giving you hints; it is a still, small voice. It does not shout at you, that is true. And if you are a little silent you will start feeling your way. Be the person you are. Never try to be another, and you will become mature. Maturity is accepting the responsibility of being oneself, whatsoever the cost. Risking all to be oneself, that’s what maturity is all about.

—Osho (via purplebuddhaproject)

Tehmina Durrani | The Woman Behind The Revolution [x]

Tehmina Durrani is a Pakistani author and activist. For 13 years, she was married to Ghulam Mustafa Khar, the former Governor of Punjab and one of the most powerful men in the country during the 70s and 80s. She chronicled her marriage in the 1991 book, My Feudal Lord, where she describes the abuse, torture, rape and humiliation she suffered at the hands of Khar. 

She faced criticism not only for speaking out against Khar, but also for staying in the marriage for 13 years and having children with him. Reviews of the book to this day disparage her for not leaving sooner or seeking help or doing more to protect her children, despite Khar commanding tremendous power and influence. On page 156, she writes: “What could the police do? They would admonish Mustafa, but sooner or later I would be alone with him, in a worse predicament than before. My silence was not to protect Mustafa; it was to protect myself.”

In 1997, Ghulam Mustafa Khar’s son, Bilal, married a woman named Fakhra Yunus. She too suffered physical abuse at the hands of her husband and escaped after three years to return to her mother’s home. However, in April 2000, Bilal Khar tracked her down and threw acid in her face while she slept. After being released from the hospital, she returned to Bilal and reached out to Tehmina Durrani for help. Tehmina intervened and took Fakhra into her own house despite facing death threats from the Khar family.

Tehmina Durrani is now the author of several books and an activist for Pakistani women and rights of the poor. Her efforts to help Fakhra were detailed in a 2001 Time Magazine article entitled “The Evil That Men Do” which also contained this iconic graphic photograph of the two of them. Fakhra Younus committed suicide on March 17, 2012 at the age of 33. Bilal Khar was acquitted of all charges.

(Source: oh-whiskers, via upworthy)

The Zen of Being You

zenmister:

The practice of Zen is being in the world as it is. Your practice begins with you. Your practice of Zen is being as much you as you can be. Being you may not be easy, but it is impossible for you not to be you. Rather that try to do the impossible and be other than you, you practice being you. To…

(Source: zenmister.com)

If you’ve been up all night and cried till you have no more tears left in you - you will know that there comes in the end a sort of quietness. You feel as if nothing was ever going to happen again.

—C.S. Lewis (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: 13neighbors, via awelltraveledwoman)

Don’t confuse poor decision-making with destiny. Own your mistakes. It’s ok; we all make them. Learn from them so they can empower you!

—Steve Maraboli (via psych-quotes)

(via panatmansam)


We all get stuck. We all lose ourselves a little bit in a fantasy or in our jobs and forget how we feel about other things. It’s really important to check yourself, to spend some time alone.

We all get stuck. We all lose ourselves a little bit in a fantasy or in our jobs and forget how we feel about other things. It’s really important to check yourself, to spend some time alone.

(Source: morningspark, via theglitterguide)

The place to improve the world is first in one’s own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there.

—Robert M. Pirsig (via thecalminside)

(via panatmansam)

omnomnom74:

buddhablessnamasteuniverse:

Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum ཨོཾ་མ་ནི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ་ Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum ཨོཾ་མ་ནི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ་ Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum ཨོཾ་མ་ནི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ་

On flickr by
Olga Berrios 

omnomnom74:

buddhablessnamasteuniverse:

Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum ཨོཾ་མ་ནི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ་
Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum ཨོཾ་མ་ནི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ་
Om Ma Ni Pad Me Hum ཨོཾ་མ་ནི་པ་དྨེ་ཧཱུྃ་

On flickr by

Olga Berrios